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All Incomplete

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Categories: Current Publications, Fred Moten, Stefano Harney, Undercommons

All Incomplete

All Incomplete
Stefano Harney and Fred Moten

Building on the ideas Harney and Moten developed in The Undercommons, All Incompleteextends the critical investigation of logistics, individuation and sovereignty. It reflects their chances to travel, listen and deepen their commitment to and claim upon partiality.

All Incomplete studies thehistory of a preference for the force and ground and underground of social existence. Engaging a vibrant constellation of thought that includes the work of Amilcar Cabral, Erica Edwards, Denise Ferreira da Silva, Cedric Robinson, Walter Rodney, Hortense Spillers and many others, Harney and Moten seek to share and understand that preference.

In so doing, Moten and Harney hope to have forged what Manolo Callahan, echoing Ivan Illich, calls a convivial tool that – despite the temptation to improve and demand, develop and govern, separate and grasp – helps us renew our habits of assembly.

All Incompletefeatures the work of award winning photographer Zun Lee, exploring and celebrating the everyday spaces of Black sociality, intimacy, belonging, and insurgency, and a preface by Denise Ferreira da Silva.

Bio:Stefano Harney and Fred Motenare authors of The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study. They are students of the black radical tradition and members of Le Mardi Gras Listening Collective. Zun Leecarves out communal spaces where Black storytelling can thrive. He often makes photographs to remind him how to be grateful. He tends to forget often. Denise Ferreira da Silva teaches at the University of British Columbia and is a member of Coletiva.

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Formless Formation

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Categories: Current Publications, Sandra Ruiz & Hypatia Vourloumis

Formless Formation

Formless Formation: Vignettes for the End of this World
Sandra Ruiz & Hypatia Vourloumis

Formless Formation is an experimental project conceived and co-authored by two performance theorists working in critical aesthetics and political thought. The book is an insurgent revolt, walking side by side with plural and planetary anticolonial forces organizing against debt, expropriative extractive capital, environmental catastrophe, and the militarized policing of people and borders. It is in direct conversation with all Indigenous, Black, Brown, ecological, feminist, queer, diasporic movements and struggles countering capitalist predatory formations across time and space. Through shared resonances across differing aesthetic-life-worlds and solidarities that bypass the nation-state, Ruiz and Vourloumis bring to the forefront performative and aesthetic practices and methods that address current and future social organizing.

“For artists, theorists, revolutionaries, activists and weirdos who are already performing aesthetic-life-worlds and reaching for the beyond in the here and now, Formless Formation is a must read! Ruiz and Vourloumis witness, celebrate, and conjoin without taking and without force. This double negation as skillful artistry extends greater dreaming space to all of us who are already so over it and also in the known unknown by way of radical praxis. This prescient co-authorship with its expansive archive and out of this world word couplings, associations, and relations will make you question the revolutionary potential of anything attributed to a single name. Following their sound, there is a trustworthy “we” at work and play that moves us to a more radical radicality. This is a capacious analysis beyond interdisciplinarity. It is how we fly, zoom, read, and dance to believe in belief yet again, which makes the inventive and experimental, a collective ours.” – Ruth Nicole Brown

“Formless Formation manages to be many things at once: theory, manifesto, astute analysis, and sharp critique. Working from a sprawling archive of sources across disciplines, Ruiz and Vourloumis mobilize a potent set of keywords in order to pinpoint and pry loose new modes of aesthetic and political engagement. As current as your twitter feed and as musical as your life, this exhilarating text traces how pivotal queer and BIPOC artists and activists sonify resistance, how resonant forms emerge from and within the noise, and how contemporary performance catalyzes other worlds.” – Vijay Iyer

Bio: Sandra Ruiz is the author of Ricanness: Enduring Time in Anticolonial Performance (NYU Press, 2019). Hypatia Vourloumis is the author of the forthcoming Paralinguistic Insurgencies: Indonesian Noise. They are alumni of the performance studies department at NYU, where they met as students. Continue reading →

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Climate Chaos. Making Art and Politics on a Dying Planet

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Categories: Current Publications, Neala Schleuning

Climate Chaos. Making Art and Politics on a Dying Planet
Neala Schleuning

Formulates an anarchist aesthetics exploring what art can mean in and do in the Anthropocene

Kant sought to contain the ancient fear and terror of the natural world in his concept of the sublime. He argued that with human reason we could safely confront an uncontrolled and powerful natural world. But today we no longer have the luxury of the Kantian sublime as we face the oppressive claustrophobic horror of drastic global climate change.

The earth itself is now threatened and livelihoods are more precarious. A new sublime incorporating the experience of awe and immensity – coupled with a profound respect for the presence of a great and unpredictable force of nature – can shape our response to the Anthropocene. Climate Chaosreassesses the Kantian sublime, opening up the opportunity to reconsider its dark side and our own fears, as we come face to face with the agency of nature beyond a rational response. Can we find ways to change our thinking, art, and politics to move beyond through the catastrophe of the present? A new aesthetics and a new political narrative of living in harmony with the earth is emerging.

Bio: Neala Schleuning is a writer and educator. She received her PhD in American Studies from the University of Minnesota in 1978 with an emphasis in political philosophy and intellectual history. Fulbright Scholar to the Russian Federation, she is the author of many articles, higher education policy papers, films and radio productions, and several books, including Artpolitik: Social Anarchist Aesthetics in an Age of Fragmentation (2013), America: Song We Sang Without Knowing(1983); Idle Hands and Empty Hearts: Work and Freedom in the United States(1990); Women, Community, and the Hormel Strike of 1985-86(1994); and To Have and to Hold: the Meaning of Ownership in the United States(1997). Continue reading →

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The Magneti Marelli Workers Committee – The “Red Guard” Tells Its Story (Milan, 1975-78)

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Categories: Current Publications, Emilio Mentasti, Genealogies

The Red Guard

The Magneti Marelli Workers Committee – The “Red Guard” Tells Its Story (Milan, 1975-78)
Emilio Mentasti

In a large factory in Milan in the mid-70s, a few dozen workers organized themselves against both the management and the unions in an autonomous Workers’ Political Committee. Soon, this “Red Guard” consisted of hundreds of workers fighting against layoffs and relocation. The Committee did not stay shut up within the walls of the factory. It participated in numerous other struggles, such as strikes and demonstrations, which were raging across the whole of Italy. Crucially, it took part in attempts to unify the movement of workers’ committees on a regional level. And it also participated in the radical struggle against inflation, where workers refused to pay ever increasing prices. This movement of autoreductionfamously inspired Dario Fo’s play Can’t Pay? Won’t Pay!

Magneti Marelli was not the only factory in Italy to create autonomous workers’ organizations, but its Committee served as a reference for all the others because of its bold initiatives and its capacity to help workers in the surrounding smaller workplaces to benefit from its experience. Its exemplary fight was a vital part of the revolutionary struggle in Italy during the hot decade 1968-1979, and one that still contains important lessons for class struggle militants today.

Bio: Emilio Mentasti is a historian who has published several books on the history and organization of the autonomous workers movement in Italy.

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Ideas Arrangements Effects: Systems Design and Social Justice

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Categories: Current Publications, The Design Studio for Social Intervention

Ideas Arrangements Effects

Ideas Arrangements Effects: Systems Design and Social Justice
The Design Studio for Social Intervention
Foreword by Arturo Escobar

A guide for using design principles to inform and shape radical politics

 Ideas are embedded in social arrangements, which in turn produce effects.

With this simple premise, this radically accessible systems design bookmakes a compelling case for arrangementsas a rich and overlooked terrain for social justice and world building. Unpacking how ideas like racism and sexism remain sturdy by embedding themselves in everything from physical and social infrastructure to everyday speech and thought habits, this book gives readers the tools to sense, intervene in and imagine new arrangements. Using diverse examples from their work and others, DS4SI offers readers a roadmap for using social interventions to invite the larger public into imagining and creating a more just and vibrant world.

“Throughout their work, DS4SI strives to enact the principle that design is not just about problem-solving within existing paradigms and social orders, it is about world building, about imagining and constructing new territories of life and difference… This is design’s imagination at its best, the grounds for a genuinely transformative design praxis. It is a route to disclosing new worlds and bringing them into existence.” – Arturo Escobar, author of Designing the Pluriverse

“As we face this dire moment of climate change, tyranny, mass extinction and international war on the global scale, and poverty, housing shortages, and stagnant wages at home, we need tools that we can use to address these problems, and it can’t be just the same old tools we’ve been using all along. This is where this excellent guide to ideas-arrangements-effects comes in.” – Mindy Thompson Fullilove, author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America, and What We Can Do About It

Bio: The Design Studio for Social Intervention is dedicated to changing how social justice is imagined, developed and deployed in the United States. Situated at the intersections of design practice, social justice, public art, and popular engagement, DS4SI designs and tests social interventions with and on behalf of marginalized populations, controversies and ways of life.Founded in 2005 and based in Boston, DS4SI is a space where activists, artists, academics and the larger public come together to imagine new approaches to social change and new solutions to complex social issues. Continue reading →

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Red Days: Popular Music & the English Counterculture 1965-1975

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Categories: Current Publications, Genealogies, John Roberts

Red Days: Popular Music & the English Counterculture 1965-1975
John Roberts

Challenges the conventional narratives about English popular music and the counterculture of the late 1960s and early 1970s

The passion, intensity and complexity of the popular music produced in England between 1965-75 is the work of an extraordinary generation of working class and lower middle class men and women (in alliance with a handful of middle-class men and women) who saw in the new music the remaking of something bigger than themselves, or more precisely, something bigger than themselves that they could guide and shape and call their own. In this the ‘use-values’ of popular music underwent an unprecedented expansion and diversity during this period. Red Days presents how music and action, music and discourse, experienced a profound re-functioning as definitions of the popular unmoored themselves from the condescending judgements of post-1950s high culture and the sentiment of the old popular culture and the musicologically conformist rock ‘n’ roll seeking to displace it. The remaking of the popular between 1965-1975, accordingly, is more than a revision of popular taste, it is, rather, the demolition of old cultural allegiances and habits, as forces inside and outside of music shattered the assumption of popular music as the home for passive adolescent identifications.

Bio: John Roberts is Professor of Art & Aesthetics at the University of Wolverhampton. He is the author of a number of books, including, The Necessity of Errors (2010), Photography and Its Violations (2014), Revolutionary Time and the Avant-Garde(2015), Thoughts on an Index Not Freely Given(2016) and The Reasoning of Unreason: Universalism, Capitalism and Disenlightenment (2018).

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The Beautiful Warriors. Technofeminist Praxis in the Twenty-First Century

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Categories: Cornelia Sollfrank, Current Publications

The Beautiful Warriors. Technofeminist Praxis in the Twenty-First Century
Edited by Cornelia Sollfrank

The Beautiful Warriors. Technofeminist Practice in the 21stCenturybrings together seven current technofeminist positions from the fields of art and activism. In very different ways, they expand the theories and practices of 1990’s cyberfeminism and thus react to new forms of discrimination and exploitation. Gender politics are negotiated with reference to technology, and questions of technology are combined with questions of ecology and economy. The different positions around this new techno-eco-feminism understand their practice as an invitation to take up their social and aesthetic interventions, to join in, to continue, and never give up.

Contributions from Christina Grammatikopoulou, Isabel de Sena, Femke Snelting, Cornelia Sollfrank, Spideralex, Sophie Toupin, hvale vale, Yvonne Volkart.

Bio:Cornelia Sollfrank is an artist, researcher, and university lecturer living in Berlin. She is the co-founder of the women-and-technology, -Innen, and Old Boys Network collectives. Currently, she works as a research associate at the University of the Arts in Zürich. Continue reading →

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Riotous Epistemology. Imaginary Power, Art, and Insurrection

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Categories: Current Publications, Richard Gilman-Opalsky, Stevphen Shukaitis

Riotous Epistemology. Imaginary Power, Art, and Insurrection
Richard Gilman-Opalsky & Stevphen Shukaitis

Riots. Revolts. Revolutions. All flashing moments which throw the world – and our relationship with it – into question. For centuries people have pinned their hopes on radical political change, on turning worlds upside down. But all too often the ever-renewed dream of changing the world for the better has ended either in failure or has been crushed.

Riotous Epistemology explores the significance of taking seriously the intellect of revolt, uprising as thinking, art as upheaval, and other forms of philosophy from below. To theorize revolt and subversive art practices as philosophy from below, it is necessary to refute conventional understandings of art and philosophy.  Continue reading →

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Laboratory of Nano-Fascism

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Categories: Interventions

Laboratory of Nano-Fascism
Gary Genosko

Review of Zafer Aracagök, Non-Conceptual Negativity: Damaged Reflections on Turkey, Goleta, CA: Punctum Books, 2019. 134pp.

Non-fascist living, inspired by Deleuze and Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus, typically draws from anarchists, punks, beatniks, Rastafarians, Black Panthers, eco-defenders, and queer cultures. [1]Zafer Aracagök’s study of Turkey as a nano-fascist laboratory for the first quarter of the 21stcentury adds a new weapon to the non-fascist’s toolkit: non-conceptual negativity aimed at contemporary forces of implosion. Non-conceptual is equivalent to non-dialectical and thus is the affirmative in the thought of Deleuze, in its anti-Hegelian and anti-Platonic elaborations. Nano-fascist forces implode the separation of worshipper and worshipped, identifier and identified, in supporting Neanderthal capitalism. This is endlessly appropriative and incorporative, and supported by those countries prepared to violently regain their apparently previous greatness (the White nationalist MAGA-type), whereas nano-fascism is akin to an aggressive Leibnizian monad:  instead of each monad’s imperfect holographic mirroring of the universe, the nano-fascist wages war against those who would deny its right to perfect its incorporation of the entire universe.   Continue reading →

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Entry Points

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Categories: Anarchivism, Awk Wah, Current Publications, Dharma, Penny Rimbaud, Stevphen Shukaitis

Entry Points. Resonating Punk, Performance, and Art
Stevphen Shukaitis, Penny Rimbaud, Dharma, and Awk Wah

Art-media project exploring resonances between punk and performance in the UK and Southeast Asia

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, as members of the performance art group EXIT, Penny Rimbaud and Gee Vaucher turned to creating outside of the gallery system and artistic conventions. Taking inspiration from eastern philosophy, particularly Buddhism and Taoism, they searched for ways to push beyond the boundaries of Western art practices and rationalities. This resonates with Redza Piyadasa and Suleiman Esa’s 1974 manifesto and exhibition Towards a Mystical Reality, which likewise sought to find a way out of the limitations of modernist art practices and rationalities. Entry Points takes up Piyadasa’s statement that art does not exist in time but only has entry points. What entry points might we find in the resonances between different attempts to utilize conceptual and performative gestures as a way to escape from the constraints one is faced with, aesthetically and politically?

Contains an essay by Stevphen Shukaitis, a dialogue between Shukaitis and Penny Rimbaud, and a recording of an improvised performance by Dharma and Awk Wah responding to footage of the Stop the City Protests. Continue reading →

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