Đất nền Long Thành Đất nền Long Thành Đồng Nai

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The Beautiful Warriors. Technofeminist Praxis in the Twenty-First Century

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Categories: Cornelia Sollfrank, Forthcoming Publications

The Beautiful Warriors

The Beautiful Warriors. Technofeminist Praxis in the Twenty-First Century
Edited by Cornelia Sollfrank

The Beautiful Warriors. Technofeminist Practice in the 21stCenturybrings together seven current technofeminist positions from the fields of art and activism. In very different ways, they expand the theories and practices of 1990’s cyberfeminism and thus react to new forms of discrimination and exploitation. Gender politics are negotiated with reference to technology, and questions of technology are combined with questions of ecology and economy. The different positions around this new techno-eco-feminism understand their practice as an invitation to take up their social and aesthetic interventions, to join in, to continue, and never give up.

Contributions from Christina Grammatikopoulou, Isabel de Sena, Femke Snelting, Cornelia Sollfrank, Spideralex, Sophie Toupin, hvale vale, Yvonne Volkart.

Bio:Cornelia Sollfrank is an artist, researcher, and university lecturer living in Berlin. She is the co-founder of the women-and-technology, -Innen, and Old Boys Network collectives. Currently, she works as a research associate at the University of the Arts in Zürich. Continue reading →

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Riotous Epistemology. Imaginary Power, Art, and Insurrection

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Categories: Forthcoming Publications, Richard Gilman-Opalsky, Stevphen Shukaitis

Riotous Epistemology

Riotous Epistemology. Imaginary Power, Art, and Insurrection
Richard Gilman-Opalsky & Stevphen Shukaitis

Riots. Revolts. Revolutions. All flashing moments which throw the world – and our relationship with it – into question. For centuries people have pinned their hopes on radical political change, on turning worlds upside down. But all too often the ever-renewed dream of changing the world for the better has ended either in failure or has been crushed.

Riotous Epistemology explores the significance of taking seriously the intellect of revolt, uprising as thinking, art as upheaval, and other forms of philosophy from below. To theorize revolt and subversive art practices as philosophy from below, it is necessary to refute conventional understandings of art and philosophy.  Continue reading →

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Laboratory of Nano-Fascism

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Categories: Interventions

Zafer

Laboratory of Nano-Fascism
Gary Genosko

Review of Zafer Aracagök, Non-Conceptual Negativity: Damaged Reflections on Turkey, Goleta, CA: Punctum Books, 2019. 134pp.

Non-fascist living, inspired by Deleuze and Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus, typically draws from anarchists, punks, beatniks, Rastafarians, Black Panthers, eco-defenders, and queer cultures. [1]Zafer Aracagök’s study of Turkey as a nano-fascist laboratory for the first quarter of the 21stcentury adds a new weapon to the non-fascist’s toolkit: non-conceptual negativity aimed at contemporary forces of implosion. Non-conceptual is equivalent to non-dialectical and thus is the affirmative in the thought of Deleuze, in its anti-Hegelian and anti-Platonic elaborations. Nano-fascist forces implode the separation of worshipper and worshipped, identifier and identified, in supporting Neanderthal capitalism. This is endlessly appropriative and incorporative, and supported by those countries prepared to violently regain their apparently previous greatness (the White nationalist MAGA-type), whereas nano-fascism is akin to an aggressive Leibnizian monad:  instead of each monad’s imperfect holographic mirroring of the universe, the nano-fascist wages war against those who would deny its right to perfect its incorporation of the entire universe.   Continue reading →

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Entry Points

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Categories: Anarchivism, Awk Wah, Current Publications, Dharma, Penny Rimbaud, Stevphen Shukaitis

Entry Points

Entry Points. Resonating Punk, Performance, and Art
Stevphen Shukaitis, Penny Rimbaud, Dharma, and Awk Wah

Art-media project exploring resonances between punk and performance in the UK and Southeast Asia

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, as members of the performance art group EXIT, Penny Rimbaud and Gee Vaucher turned to creating outside of the gallery system and artistic conventions. Taking inspiration from eastern philosophy, particularly Buddhism and Taoism, they searched for ways to push beyond the boundaries of Western art practices and rationalities. This resonates with Redza Piyadasa and Suleiman Esa’s 1974 manifesto and exhibition Towards a Mystical Reality, which likewise sought to find a way out of the limitations of modernist art practices and rationalities. Entry Points takes up Piyadasa’s statement that art does not exist in time but only has entry points. What entry points might we find in the resonances between different attempts to utilize conceptual and performative gestures as a way to escape from the constraints one is faced with, aesthetically and politically?

Contains an essay by Stevphen Shukaitis, a dialogue between Shukaitis and Penny Rimbaud, and a recording of an improvised performance by Dharma and Awk Wah responding to footage of the Stop the City Protests. Continue reading →

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i hate war but i hate our enemies even more­­­

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Categories: Forthcoming Publications, Heath Schultz & Becky Nasadowski

i hate war but i hate our enemies even more

i hate war but i hate our enemies even more­­­
Heath Schultz & Becky Nasadowski

 Arranged from a partisan perspective in the era of the uprising, i hate war, but i hate our enemies even more is an unconventional textual object that uses détournement, collage, and experimental writing against reactionary liberalism, capitalism, and white supremacy.

Critical theory, police propaganda, militant cinema, country songs, activist histories, and white reactionary protests are used as raw material to stage ideological juxtapositions. George Wallace speaks to Stokely Carmichael in Watts. Radio Raheem hears conservative country music through his boombox while telling the story of Love and Hate. Darren Wilson supporters share the stage with Al Sharpton. Peter Watkins’ Communards sing La Marseillaise and Bill Withers sings Grandma’s Hands in the same set.

In these conjunctions, we find the reproduction of struggle and the potential for short-circuiting the reproduction of white supremacy. This book aims to enact a critical theory of the spectacle as it joins the practical movement of negation within society.

Bio:Heath Schultz is a research-based artist and writer. His work addresses questions of institutional critique, activism, contemporary politics, and the political efficacy of art. He is an assistant professor of art at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

Becky Nasadowski is a designer and design educator at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Her research takes a critical, multi-disciplinary approach to design, contextualizing the field within discussions of race, gender, and class.
Continue reading →

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Emotions Go to Work Exhibition

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Categories: Events, Zoe Beloff

Emotions Go to Work

Emotions Go to Work Exhibition
19 January – 24 March 2019
Firstsite, Colchester, UK

Ever since the 19th century, people have been collecting scientific data from the human body and cataloguing emotions. Today, smart devices try to gain our trust in order to compile information. We create machines in our image, shaped to serve our desires – and in turn they reshape us. Beloff explores where this evolution is taking society. Can these technological systems understand our feelings? Will emojis determine our emotional life? As technology takes on more and more emotional characteristics, how will they change the nature of our desires?

Emotions Go to Work presents itself as a cacophony of faces (human and nonhuman) which are either animated, illustrated or performed, alongside a series of symbols of old and new technological advancement. The multi-media installation comprising film projection, watercolours and cardboard cut-outs, charts the interwoven history of Man and machine through re-workings and pastiches of existing cultural material from our collective consciousness – from samples of early black and white cartoons to emojis, and from early kinetic experiments in film to slick advertorials. From a smiling typewriter to the Internet of things, Emotions Go to Work asks what balance must be struck between creating helpful technologies and entrusting machines with the freedom to reshape us in their image.

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Combination Acts

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Categories: Alan W Moore, Forthcoming Publications, Fred Moten, Gee Vaucher, Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination, Stevphen Shukaitis, Undercommons

Combination Acts

Combination Acts. Notes on Collective Practice in the Undercommons
Stevphen Shukaitis

Dialogues and essays exploring collaboration in artist collective & self-organized cultural production

During the industrial revolution artisans and craft workers sparked struggles against exploitation while the force of law drove unions underground. Today conditions are different… yet they are not. Collective organizing is pre-empted not by legal prohibition but rather by a perverse internalized neoliberal logic that celebrates the precarious creative worker as its exemplar.

Combination Acts draws together fifteen years of conversations with artists, musicians, activists, and theorists about the nature of collaborative practice. What sociality is produced by their practices? What forms of collectivity do they animate and embody? Taken together these dialogues provide a series of study notes for and from the self-organization of the undercommons, gesturing towards an aesthetics that occupies a space of power for itself by coming to close to, but never finally reaching, a set form.

“The mood and tense of revolution can be obscure even to those who act it out – as polyphonic combination, cutting normative conceptions of person and number – in beautifully everyday experiments that strain against the brutally ongoing. Thankfully, in this timely primer, Stevphen Shukaitis reminds us how to conjugate the verbs to live, to fight, and to enjoy.” – Fred Moten, New York University

Combination Acts offers an overview of political cultural tools and tactics radicals have mobilized over the 20th century and into the 21st.  Shukaitis steers through rebellious terrain, from cyberhacking and forms of sabotage to critiques of global neoliberal institutions and horizontal re-commoning, opening new terrains of speculative imaginative possibilities. A necessary guide to militant culture in the new millennium.” – Jaleh Mansoor, University of British Columbia

Combination Acts is an exhilarating read as it boldly combines optimism (the always renewed burden of struggles on the left) and pragmatism (the requirement of actually existing praxis). Engaging dialogues and theoretical analysis are also combined in this cutting-edge study, on material and in ways that are indispensable for carrying forward the spirit and actuality of insurgent togetherness. The key question of the book – what interventions would be needed so that the grammar of self-organization would not find itself rendered into the fixed forms of capital’s continued accumulation demands? – is answered through multiple narrative documents of real-life experience crossing through the art field. At the very least, the book informs us of the depth of critical thought from which practices of anti-status-quo alternatives stem; as for what the book achieves at its best, this is dependent on whether and how we seek to implement what we learn from it. An essential and inspirational reality check on collaboration, labour, its content and discontent, and the conundrum of art activism, among numerous other markers of the zeitgeist.” – Angela Dimitrakaki, University of Edinburgh

Bio: Stevphen Shukaitis is Senior Lecturer at the University of Essex, Centre for Work and Organization, and a member of the Autonomedia editorial collective. He is the author of Imaginal Machines: Autonomy & Self-Organization in the Revolutions of Everyday Day (2009) and The Composition of Movements to Come: Aesthetics and Cultural Labor After the Avant-Garde (2016). His research focuses on the emergence of collective imagination in social movements and the changing compositions of cultural and artistic labor. Continue reading →

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Emotions Go to Work

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Categories: Forthcoming Publications, Zoe Beloff

Emotions Go to Work Exhibition

Emotions Go to Work
Zoe Beloff

 Artist book investigating how technology is used to transform feelings into capital

 Emotions Go to Work is an investigation into how technology is used to turn our feelings into valuable assets. One might call it the transformation of emotion into capital. It asks what is at stake in our relationship with the companions we call smart objects? What does the future hold in store for a world where people are treated more and more like things, while the billions of gadgets that make up the Internet of Things are increasingly anthropomorphized, granted agency?

Spanning an arc of time from the 18th century to 21st century and beyond, Emotions Go To Work traces the codification and instrumentalization emotional data in ways both playful and serious. It considers the role emojis play our mental life and their potential to evolve and grow monstrous. It suggests that anthropomorphized technological creatures from early cartoons might inspire a utopian society. Proposing that the first step to re-wiring our world is to picture possibilities in games and in play, in dreams and in far-fetched fictions, so that we can begin new conversations between people and things.

Bio: Zoe Beloff is an artist and filmmaker. Her work aims to connect the present to past so that it might illuminate the future in new ways. Themes include proposals for new forms of community; The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle 1926 – 1972 or The Days of the Commune staged as series of street performances to new ways about thinking about labor in The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff and Emotions Go To Work. Zoe presents her work internationally in museums, alternative spaces and film festivals. She is a Professor in Media and Art at Queens College CUNY. Continue reading →

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A Little Philosophical Lexicon of Anarchism from Proudhon to Deleuze

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Categories: Daniel Colson, Forthcoming Publications

A Little Philosophical Lexicon of Anarchism from Proudhon to Deleuze

A Little Philosophical Lexicon of Anarchism from Proudhon to Deleuze
Daniel Colson
Translated by Jesse Cohn

A provocative exploration of hidden affinities and genealogies in anarchist thought

Is the thought of Gilles Deleuze secretly linked to Pierre-Joseph Proudhon’s declaration: “I am an anarchist”? Has anarchism, for more than a century and a half, been secretly Deleuzian? In the guise of a playfully unorthodox lexicon, sociologist Daniel Colson presents an exploration of hidden affinities between the great philosophical heresies and “a thought too scandalous to take its place in the official edifice of philosophy,” with profound implications for the way we understand social movements.

“In a creative and yet precise way, Daniel Colson brings together two lines of thought – philosophy from Spinoza to Leibniz – and anarchism from Proudhon to the present day. At their intersection he discovers an affirmative and expressive anarchism that rejects all forms of resentment and negativity. This is anarchism as joy and empowerment rather than sadness and accusation.” – Todd May, author of The Political Philosophy of Poststructuralist Anarchism

“Colson’s Lexicon is an inspiring resource for conceptualizing anarchism: it offers new, exciting paths for exploring anarchism with French thought and French thought with anarchism.” – Iwona Janicka, author of Theorizing Contemporary Anarchism

“This is a fantastic (and anarchist) way to arrange a book. Reading these various entries in any order offers a line of thinking that connects disparate thinkers ranging from Proudhon to Simondon to Nietzsche to Deleuze within the term anarchism. This is done not to bind these thinkers with the kinds of straightjackets that names – even the name anarchism – often perform but rather to associate, interconnect and arrange these thinkers in a way that speaks across several centuries, practices and ways of thinking. What emerges is a radical challenge to the insistence on dialectic resolution, to occult left teleologies, and to the certainty that past anarchists have nothing to say to contemporary anarchists (and visa versa). In his claim that anarchism first of all is a “rejection of first principles,” Colson shows how, far from being disabling and rendering the world incoherent, this understanding recognizes the affirmative nature of an anarchism that has not ceased to function amidst between and even through myriad forms of capitalist and archist oppression.” – James Martel, author of The Misinterpellated Subject

Bio: Daniel Colson is a professor of sociology at the Université de St.-Étienne in Lyon. He is the author of Trois Essais de Philosophie Anarchiste: Islam, Histoire, Monadologie (2004) as well as several studies of French labor history.

Jesse Cohn is an associate professor of English at Purdue University Northwest. He is the author of Anarchism and the Crisis of Representation: Hermeneutics, Aesthetics, Politics (2006) and Underground Passages: Anarchist Resistance Culture, 1848–2011 (2014). Continue reading →

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Neurocapitalism

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Categories: Forthcoming Publications, Giorgio Griziotti

Neurocapitalism

Neurocapitalism. Technological Mediation and Vanishing Lines
Giorgio Griziotti
Foreword by Tiziana Terranova
Translated by Jason Francis McGimsey

Analyzes the changing politics of technology, charting out possibilities for autonomous cooperation

Technological change is ridden with conflicts, bifurcations and unexpected developments. Neurocapitalism takes us on an extraordinarily original journey through the effects that cutting-edge technology has on cultural, anthropological, socio-economic and political dynamics. Today, neurocapitalism shapes the technological production of the commons, transforming them into tools for commercialization, automatic control, and crisis management.

But all is not lost: in highlighting the growing role of General Intellect’s autonomous and cooperative production through the development of the commons and alternative and antagonistic uses of new technologies, Giorgio Griziotti proposes new ideas for the organization of the multitudes of the new millennium.

“it is rare to find a book… which is capable of combining a competent technical viewpoint with a coherent theoretical perspective… animated by a great political passion nourished by the ‘common learning’ of collective self-training.” – Tiziana Terranova

Bio: Giorgio Griziotti was one of the first digital engineers to graduate from Milan’s Politecnico University. His participation in the autonomous movements in Italy in the 1970s forced him to gain most of his professional experience in exile. He has an experience of more than thirty years in large international IT projects. Today he is an independent researcher and member of the collective Effimera. Continue reading →

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